WOMEN & CELLULITE

INFS

 | 1 minute to read
Others
By Asmita Shah

Cellulite is the formation of dimples and lumps in the skin, often described as an ‘orange peel’, mattress-like appearance. It affects the subcutaneous tissue around the thighs, buttocks, and hips, the areas where adipose tissue is deposited in the largest amounts in women. Cellulite has been reported to occur in 85-98% of post‐adolescent women and rarely in men. It is different from generalized obesity and not specific to overweight women. Weight gain makes it more noticeable but it may be present even in leaner body frames. The hormone estrogen is responsible for this increased collagenous connective tissue. Other causes are: Genetics Dietary factors like excessive intake of food products rich in fats, with a high salt and preservative content. Sedentary Lifestyle: Lack of physical activity increases the severity of cellulite, by weakening the muscle layer of the blood vessels Alcohol consumption: Alcohol consumption stimulates lipogenesis and causes body dehydration, resulting in the excessive and improper storage of fat. Is there any way to eliminate the appearance of cellulite? The only way to change the visual appearance is to alter body composition i.e. to lose body fat and increase muscle mass. Laser, topical agents, energy-based devices, wave therapy, various surgical options have failed to elicit any long-lasting results. References: Tokarska, K., Tokarski, S., Woźniacka, A., Sysa-Jędrzejowska, A., & Bogaczewicz, J. (2018). Cellulite: a cosmetic or systemic issue? Contemporary views on the etiopathogenesis of cellulite. Advances in Dermatology and Allergology/Postȩpy Dermatologii i Alergologii, 35(5), 442. Quatresooz, P., Xhauflaire‐Uhoda, E., Piérard‐Franchimont, C., & Piérard, G. E. (2006). Cellulite histopathology and related mechanobiology. International journal of cosmetic science, 28(3), 207-210. Luebberding, S., Krueger, N., & Sadick, N. S. (2015). Cellulite: an evidence-based review. American journal of clinical dermatology, 16(4), 243-256.
Global Community background